dröm sessions: Hanna Konola (Finland)

This March’s dröm sessions, we had the opportunity to catch up with Finnish illustrator – Hanna Konola! Hanna uses the most quirky and somewhat unexpected pairings and combinations from the colour palette, her illustrations are so simplistic yet so complex both at the same time. We stumbled and fell in love with Hanna’s works when we saw them at Tokyo in indie stores such as Galerie Doux Dimanche & Uguisu.

But now let’s go beyond & dig deeper into Hanna’s creative brains as we interview her, let’s go!

Check out our full interview here.

This February’s dröm sessions calls for Swedish illustration goodness! This session, we speak to Swedish illustrator/artist – Camilla Engman! Let’s start our little adventure with her as we find out a wee bit more about her as we go behind the canvas of her art pieces.

Distant Friends, postcards - a collaboration with Ana Ventura

A collaboration between Camilla & Elisabeth Dunker

Pia König’s and Camilla Engman’s collaboration

Camilla’s little collections of odds & ends.

One encouraging advice Camilla left us with – “Have fun! Don’t try too hard to find your own voice, it will come when you least expect it if you just let go.”

Read our full interview here: www.thelittledromstore.com/session-12-camilla-engman/

This February’s dröm sessions calls for Swedish illustration goodness! This session, we speak to Swedish illustrator/artist – Camilla Engman! Let’s start our little adventure with her as we find out a wee bit more about her as we go behind the canvas of her art pieces.

Distant Friends, postcards - a collaboration with Ana VenturaDistant Friends, postcards - a collaboration with Ana Ventura

Exif_JPEG_PICTUREA collaboration between Camilla & Elisabeth Dunker

Pia König's and Camilla Engman's collaborationPia König’s and Camilla Engman’s collaboration

8plasticcollectionwoodCamilla’s little collections of odds & ends.

One encouraging advice Camilla left us with – “Have fun! Don’t try too hard to find your own voice, it will come when you least expect it if you just let go.

Read our full interview here: www.thelittledromstore.com/session-12-camilla-engman/

dröm sessions: Donna Wilson

For our latest dröm sessions, we speak to Donna Wilson! I’m sure she needs no introduction at all! Personally we’ve been fans of her craft/work, we remember going crazy after seeing her launch of her cushion cloud range, we wanted every single one of them! That was years back, and now this year – 2013, marks Donna Wilson’s 10 years anniversary! How time flies!

Read the full interview here.

Stay curious and inspired as always, drömmers!

dröm sessions: Ingela P. Arrhenius

You’ve seen the series of brooches that Ingela had designed for us, now we go behind the scenes to speak to Swedish illustrator – Ingela P. Arrhenius for our latest dröm sessions! And yes, this is how Ingela looks like :)

"I’ve always loved the style of the 50´s and 60´s. I love the colors, the compositions, the ceramics, the patterns, the books – everything from that era. And I always have." – Ingela

Ingela shares with us little nugget bits of creativity and what inspires her. She also introduced us Primus, her pet dog, Doesn’t he look like a sweet little lamb secretly disguised as a dog!

Click here for the full interview.

dröm sessions: Lili Scratchy

We catch up with French illustrator – Frédérique Bellier, better known as Lili Scratchy! Read our full interview with here over at our website here.

" I would tell all aspiring illustrators out there that having the sensibility is more important than the technique.
 To feed your spirit, with readings, exhibitions, movies and music.
 Keeping your eyes & ears open very big!!!” ~ Lili Scratchy

Lili Scratchy’s badges and postcards are also available at the little drôm store!

dröm sessions: Polkaros

For the month of March, we spoke to Singaporean lifestyle product & zakka designer, Ros Lee also known as the amazing Polkaros! Polkaros is and has been working/living in Japan for many years now. In this interview, we find out from her what creativity and courage is all about, especially when she made the bold decision to relocate herself to another country of a different language and culture to pursue her dreams.

For all you MT Tape fanatics that have yet to set foot on any MT Factory tours, Polkaros also shares with us her magical experience she had at the MT factory tour and also at the MT hotel!

Read the full interview over at out website here!
http://www.thelittledromstore.com/session-7-polkaros/

To all Polkaros fans, her lifestyle zine is available and for sale at the little dröm store, it comes with a Polkaros totebag too!


dröm sessions: Beci Orpin

Read our full interview with Beci over on our website here.
For this month’s dröm sessions, we speak to Australian designer, Beci Orpin! As visual junkies at heart, we definitely went gaga crazy over Beci’s Orpin love for collecting and creating. Her great sense of mastering the art of orchestrating all that palette of psychedelic colours, and ability to harmonize all the eclectic elements within her work(s) is definitely a jaw dropper. It is definitely no easy feat for us, but they all seem so effortless for Beci. So here’s a little bit of what goes behind her magic.

For those of you who might be thinking of visiting Melbourne, Beci actually shared some of her recommended favourite places in this dröm sessions!

dröm sessions: Beci Orpin

Read our full interview with Beci over on our website here.

For this month’s dröm sessions, we speak to Australian designer, Beci Orpin! As visual junkies at heart, we definitely went gaga crazy over Beci’s Orpin love for collecting and creating. Her great sense of mastering the art of orchestrating all that palette of psychedelic colours, and ability to harmonize all the eclectic elements within her work(s) is definitely a jaw dropper. It is definitely no easy feat for us, but they all seem so effortless for Beci. So here’s a little bit of what goes behind her magic.

For those of you who might be thinking of visiting Melbourne, Beci actually shared some of her recommended favourite places in this dröm sessions!

Gemma drawing for her exhibition mural at Chapter, Cardiff.

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Happy December all you drömmers! We’re sure Gemma is no stranger to many of you, you might have already stumbled upon her works on magazines such as Frankie and Anorak.

We all know her illustrations never ever fail to put smiles on faces, they could possibly chase all your Monday blues away too. Occasionally, we’ve even had customers giggling to themselves quietly at a corner while browsing Gemma’s products over at our store.

And so, especially to all you pug lovers out there, this month we speak to UK illustrator Gemma Correll!!

#1) Hello there Gemma! We’d like to know how did illustration became a part of who you are, what started your passion?
As a child, the things I loved to do most were read books and draw pictures. My parents had some cartoon books, like The Far Side and annuals by the British cartoonist Giles and I’d spend hours reading those. Even though I didn’t completely understand them, I loved the combination of text and image with humour. I’d collect old notepads and make my own “books” and I wrote and illustrated a page in my church newsletter every month for nearly 10 years. At school, I used any project as an excuse to draw cartoons and I entered lots of competitions, too. I knew very early in my life that I wanted to draw and write for a living.

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Cartoons for Emirates Airlines In-Flight magazine 2

#2) Seeing that you always draw up something daily, we’d imagine you’d have heaps of sketch books/pads by now, how do you decide/choose which illustrations get to see the light of day? What inspires you to illustrate the way do?

Yes, I have lots of sketchbooks. I love them. I think they’re the things I would save first (apart from the Pugs and Anthony, obviously) if my house was on fire. I keep the ideas until they fit a particular project, or sometimes if I really like an idea and I have a bit of spare time, I’ll draw it up ‘properly’. My style is very quick and intuitive, I like to get my ideas down onto paper in the simplest way possible.

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#3) What are some of your favorite tool/object from our studio, things that you love very much?

My favourite things are really just the simple necessities- my sketchbooks, paper, pens and pencils and inks. My chair is pretty comfy, too.

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desk4imagepictured above are snippets of Gemma’s studio

#4) Do you have an all time favorite Gemma Correll illustration/project piece/product?

I guess it would have to be my “Pugs Not Drugs” illustration. Even though I am kind of sick of it now, it is my most popular image and it’s really helped my work get noticed, especially since it’s been printed on various different products, including T-shirts and tote bags. It’s a couple of years old now (I drew it in 2009) but it’s still popular and it reminds me of Mr Pickles, because sales of the tote bag helped me raise the money I needed to buy a pug puppy!

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Gemma and Mr Pickles



#5) What are some of the things you do to cheer yourself up, or to relieve you from any ideas block? Any favorite places you’d visit or some of your all time comfort food that do the trick?

We have a local café that I love to visit, we are friends with the staff and they always cheer me up while also providing me with much-needed caffeine. I also like to go for a walk- if it’s not raining- with the pugs or have a look in some secondhand “charity” shops in the neighbourhood. If I’m having an ideas block, I often read some magazines or the newspaper, somewhere comfy, with my sketchbook next to me. That usually helps!

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Gemma Correll badges for Made By White
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A snippet from Gemma’s What I Wore Today collection

#6) Your husband, Anthony Zinonos, is also an illustrator, how do you both inspire and encourage each other? It’s always heartening to know that your partner is also in the same industry, that way, both are able to better understand and share each other’s woes and joys as artists. (Our puggiest congrats on your recent wedding too btw!!)

We both work in the same studio, so it’s nice working together in a comfortable silence or with some nice music and being able to bounce ideas off each other.  Our illustration styles are very different- mine is cartoon-y and he does collage - but we share a similar sense of humour which comes across in our work in different ways. It’s great to be able to help each other with the less-fun bits of being freelance, like accounts and admin, and we both understand that freelance hours are not the standard 9-5 but encourage each other not to overwork and to take breaks and eat proper meals!
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Screenshot of Anthony’s Website.
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Anthony’s “15 slides’ zine”, available in his online store here.

#7) What are both of your biggest aspiration as illustrators, do you & Anthony have any future plans to collaborate or perhaps even set up a design/illustration studio?

We are always talking about collaborating, but we never have time. I guess we’ll do it one day. We would both love to live in America somewhere and have a big open plan studio but I don’t know if that will even happen, realistically.

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An embroidery for “Ceci n’est pas un Pug” at Land Gallery PDX

#8) Your super adorable pugs, Mr Norman Pickles & Bella must be such bundles of joy to have around your studio! Do they bug you at all while you are working, secretly hoping for some treats and walkies? How are you able to resist their adorable silly faces? We know we can’t with our pugs around, we’re often very easily distracted by their subtle acts of emotional bribery. What are some of their quirks that often amuses both you and Anthony?

Usually, when we’re in the studio, the pugs will sleep in their baskets. Mr Pickles sometimes wants to play and it’s hard to say no when he looks so cute. He also likes to jump up on my lap while I’m working which is lovely but it’s not very easy to draw with him there! They are both so entertaining though, I love having them in the studio. They’re always making funny little noises. They have a basket each but Bella will often go and sit on top of poor Mr Pickles in his basket.


The tao of pug

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Bella

Mr Norman Pickles


Visit Mr Pickles & Bella’s blog here! Or add them as your facebook friends if you’d like.

#9) Do you travel overseas frequently? Would you by any chance, ever pop by to our little sunny island, Singapore?

I do travel quite a lot. I’m very lucky. I’ve never been to Asia though (or anywhere further east than Cyprus, in fact) and I would absolutely love to visit Singapore. It looks beautiful.

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Exhibition at Small Stuff 4 at Bird Gallery, Launderhill (Florida)

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INKYGOODNESS exhibition at Custard Factory (Birmingham)

#10) Lastly, is there anything that you can say to advise or encourage all new/aspiring illustrators out there?

I always encourage aspiring illustrators to work hard and persevere, even though it can seem like an uphill struggle at times. You really have to love what you do. As they say, genius is one percent inspiration and ninety nine percent perspiration.

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Mural for Comma exhibition (Oxford) with Mr Pickles basking in the sunlight!

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If you’d like to bring a piece of Gemma Correll’s awesomeness home, hop on over to our store! We’ve got a couple of Gemma’s products stocked at the little dröm store. For your (almost) daily dose of Gemma’s wit, visit her blog here!

Debbie Carlos’s art has been something that remained deeply etched in our heads throughout the years. Her photographs often contain a little quirk and a somewhat silent space within that allows her subjects to have voices of their own. We’ve been a fan of her works, even from many years back. So for this dröm sessions, we’re actually quite excited to share the works of Debbie Carlos. It was a nice warm fuzzy feeling to be able to speak with her since.

Debbie was born in Los Angeles and grew up in Manila, Philippines. She has since studied psychology at Clark University in Massachusetts and photography at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.




Hello there Debbie! How did photography became a part of who you are, what started your passion in photography?

Hi Dröm!
I have enjoyed making art since I was young. My first real experience with using the camera in a knowledgeable way was during the summer I spent at a fine arts camp during high school. That’s where I really fell in love with photography, but I had to pack up my camera during college to study psychology. During the last semester of my senior year, I took a photography class and was hooked again. After getting my first degree in psychology, I went back to school to study photography.


a 2012 calendar: collaborative work between Debbie & her brother, Dante Carlos.


Test printing on fabric

What is the driving force behind your craft? What makes you pick up your camera and decide on what makes a shot?

Its funny because I know exactly what I like and what I like to capture but am not entirely sure why and when I make that decisive moment to press the shutter button. Its sort of an informed but intuitive process. A lot of times, I’ll take a picture of something when I don’t even feel that strongly about it. I’ll go back to it after a little while and see why I took it. The way the subject is glancing, something caught in the background. Its like a weird middle ground between happy accident and knowing.


If we’re not mistaken, you used to “revive” vintage analogue cameras (I think it was the Kodak Brownie) that used obsolete films by modifying them. Do you have any photograph(s) that were successfully shot & developed from this experiment? Can you describe a little, what modifications were made to produce these shots?

Yeah, I used to be into the old (and new) toy cameras. I didn’t do much modifying other than sealing holgas and dianas with electrical tape to prevent light leaks. I used to also mess up my polaroids once they came out of the camera by bending it to try to get a weird effect in the image.  

At one point, maybe 7 years ago , I mainly used my diana, holga, polaroids and a lomo lc-a as my primary equipment so most of the images from that time were probably made on toy cameras.


results from one of debbie’s toy camera modification experimentation

Analogue & film or digital & pixels? Do you have a preference between these 2 mediums, why?

I will always prefer shooting on film and bringing it into digital for post. There is something about film — the grain, the almost instant atmosphere and loveliness it can inject into images. It just imbues the picture with feeling, emotion, meaning.  I edit digitally because I feel like I have more control, the process is faster and its also cheaper. I’ve never really liked the darkroom process.


Do you have a favorite camera that you usually shoot with? Do you have a collection of many cameras at home, if so, how many (both working ones and for display)?

Up until about a year ago, I had been using a pentax 35mm slr for most of my pictures but I have gotten increasingly frustrated with the cost of film and how inconsistent the image quality was. Also, being able to blow up 35mm images was very limiting. I now shoot with a Canon Rebel for both personal and professional projects.

It seems like much fun to visit the spaces of creative individuals! What made you decide to start on your project “studio tours”? Would you eventually publish a printed publication out of these photos?

The first studio tour I did was actually something someone hired me to do. I found I really loved it. A lot of the pictures in my body of work take place in an interior or a domestic environment and I think its sort of an extension of that. A studio is a home away from home. Its a work space but its also really personal. I’ve always felt like it was cool, even a privilege,  to see what goes on behind the scenes but maybe I just like to have an excuse to snoop around.

I also love being able to connect with people I really admire. That’s probably the best part.


studio tour: bf/gf
Studio tour: Boyfren/Girlfren





AHC: Modern Adornments by Debbie

We really enjoy reading your blog because you are so hands on in other forms of creative mediums as well, apart from photography. We love your embroidered scouts patches, they’re brilliant! You also started AHC in 2011, where you create your own line of accessories as well. Were all all these creativity discovered when you were young or along the way, as you grew up?

Thanks! In terms of the jewelry, I used to make simple necklaces when I was young. One of my favorite memories is going to buy beads, cords and clasps every time my family would go to Taiwan every summer. I would spend hours in my grandparent’s house making necklaces and bracelets and giving them away to my family.

The embroidery is a more recent discovery from my time at art school. Both embroidery and jewelry making are such tactile activities and a really nice change from clicking a bunch of buttons and being on the computer.




some of Debbie’s hand embroidered scout patches, aren’t they just amazing?!

Do you have an all time favorite Debbie Carlos photo/creation/project?

I’m not sure. I have a lot of pictures that become favorite pictures of the moment, but being someone that uses her camera constantly and does not usually work in series, my favorites always change.


Featured directly above is one of Debbie’s favourite photo

You studied psychology at Clark University in Massachusetts and photography at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. We’re reminded of how some friends/customers often struggled choosing between the academic & creative side of them. It is 1 thing to call what you love a hobby and another to call it a career. What made you decide to pursue/choose photography instead, what were some of your main thoughts/mental conflicts behind it (if any), and was it a tough choice?

There was never really a doubt in my mind that being an artist or a photographer was a good and valid profession. The only hesitation came from whether I would be any good, whether anyone would like my work, and whether I could make a living from it. After graduating from art school, I was working in photography, just not as a photographer. When my position as a studio manager went from full time to part time, I had to find a way of making more money so I was essentially pushed into putting my own work out there. It was scary for sure, but I think it was one of the best things that happened to me.


Lastly, is there anything that you can say to encourage/advice all creative individuals out there who are thinking of making a career switch, or are contemplating between pursuing their creative side over the academics?

Doing what makes you happy is the most important thing.


To read up more about Debbie and her recent works, visit her blog here!

masthead: tatum


For this dröm session, we put the spotlight on photographer, Tatum Shaw. 
Currently residing in Portland, Oregon, he shoots on both analogue and digital platforms. Some of his works include photo contributions in Nylon Magazine, Oregon Tourism, and Bloomberg’s BusinessWeek magazine. In this interview, he shares with us a few of of his favorite things, and also what inspires him.

Von Tundra
Von Tundra for Nylon Magazine. Von Tundra is an American design house specializing in the creation of contemporary furniture, fixtures, installations, and interiors



Hello there Tatum, please introduce yourself.

I’m Tatum Shaw. I’m a photographer.

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How did photography became a part of who you are, what started your passion in photography?

I’ve been taking pictures since college, but it wasn’t until after college, at a portfolio school for advertising, that I came to understand composition and what makes a good image. After that, I began taking pictures in a whole new way. When I got out of school, I began work at an advertising agency and was exposed to all kinds of photographers. I learned about film and cameras and decided I wanted to give photography more serious attention. All it took was for a few images to come out really nice to convince me that this was something I could do.

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What is the driving force behind your craft? What makes you pick up your camera and decide on what makes a shot?

It’s usually something that strikes me as odd. A composition. A color pattern. A pose. Certain lighting. Those are my favorite shots to get. Weird little visuals that present themselves in the day to day. I like capturing them for myself and then sharing them for other people to see.

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You are currently residing in Portland, Oregon, can you describe your surroundings and environment from where you live? Does it inspire you in any way?

Portland, for the most part, is dark and rainy. I rarely pick up my camera here except for the few summer months of sunshine. That’s why you’ll see most of my photos are taken in the south, when I’m visiting home, or when I’m traveling away for my job. A lot of them take place in Los Angeles, where I go for work a lot.

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Tatum had his first ever solo photo show at the Wieden + Kennedy gallery on January 5 2012.





Could you name us some of your favorite spots/ shops/ cafes/ eateries in Portland, could you introduce them to us?

Ampersand. There’s no photo/art book store like it. Extremely well curated shop with monthly installations, as well as vintage art finds. Everything from old mug shot photos to scientific textbook illustrations.



DOC. My favorite restaurant. Small place with a kitchen in the front. You meet the cooks as you walk in. They you drink amazing wines and fresh food.



PokPok. Vietnamese street food. I crave it twice a week.

We see that you also shoot using Polaroids, 35mm films, together with large and medium formats. If tight deadlines weren’t a priority, would you have preferred shooting on analogue film/film cameras as opposed to digital and why?

So far I’ve been lucky that all my paying jobs have let me shoot film. It’s what I prefer. Digital, to me, is just cold and clinical. I don’t feel anything with it.  Even if I see a digital image I like, it’s usually been reworked in post to look like film.

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What are some of your favorite tool/object from our studio, things that you love very much?

Well, I don’t have a studio. I have an office in my house with high ceilings, a skylight, and a leather couch. It looks out into my back yard. I like going from my computer at my desk to my couch with a book or art book, and then back again. My favorite tool from my studio would be my Contax camera.

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Tatum Shaw’s favourite camera

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Part of Tatum Shaw’s office


Do you have an all time favorite Tatum Shaw photo/creation/project? 

There are a couple early shots of mine. The dollhouse in my Etowah series, and the cigarette in the hand from behind a pole I shot in New York. I like those because they were two of the first images I shot on film. When I saw them, I thought, “This is what I want to do. This is what I want all my pictures to look like.” They kind of set the tone for my voice.

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dollhouse from the Etowah series

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Lastly, is there anything that you can say to encourage all new/aspiring photographer out there?

Keep going. Don’t get discouraged. It took me years to figure out what makes a good image. I know a lot of talented people who pick up a camera for a few months, but then put it back down because they get frustrated. They could be so good. I still keep a Flickr page. All my early stuff is on there, even the crappy old 4mb digital shots. I was pretty bad. I just kept at it.

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A shot inside Inventory magazine store during his Vancouver visit.